Beloit Keel Laying

Major General Marcia M. Anderson (U.S. Army, Ret.)

This article originally appears courtesy of the City of Beloit, WI.

Lockheed Martin and Fincantieri Marinette Marine marked the beginning of construction on Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) 29, the future USS Beloit, with a ceremony in Marinette. As part of a ship-building tradition dating back centuries, a shipyard worker welded into the ship’s keel plate the initials of Major General Marcia M. Anderson (U.S. Army, Retired), USS Beloit ship sponsor and a Beloit, Wisconsin, native. This plate will be affixed to the ship and travel with Beloit throughout its commissioned life.

LCS 29 will be the 15th Freedom-variant LCS and will join a class of more than 30 ships. To date, four Freedom-variant LCS have deployed to support U.S. Navy presence and peacekeeping missions. In May, LCS 7 (USS Detroit) partnered with a U.S. Navy destroyer and Coast Guard teams to serve interdiction missions in the U.S. Southern Command Area of Responsibility.

“With two deployments so far this year, Freedom-variant LCS have proven that they are capable and can serve a unique role in the U.S. Navy’s fleet,” said Joe DePietro, vice president and general manager of Small Combatants and Ship Systems. “LCS’ speed, maneuverability and flexibility allows the ship to serve a multitude of missions by quickly integrating equipment and deploying manned and unmanned aerial, surface or sub-surface vehicles.”

In total, there are more than 500,000 nautical miles under the keel of Freedom-variant LCS. The ship delivers advanced capability in anti-submarine, surface, and mine countermeasure missions, and was designed to evolve with the changing security environment. As near-peer competition from large nation states increases, Lockheed Martin is partnering with the Navy to evolve LCS to meet these threats. Targeted upgrades are already underway with naval strike missiles being installed in support of upcoming deployments. Future installs of improved electronic warfare and decoy launching systems are under development.

LCS 29 is the first Navy ship to be named after Beloit, Wisconsin, and the ship’s sponsor has personal ties to Beloit. During a long career with the U.S. military, Major General Anderson became the first African American woman to obtain the rank of major general in the U. S. Army and U. S. Army Reserve. As a citizen-soldier, Anderson was employed for 28 years by the United States Courts, where she served as the Clerk of the Bankruptcy Court, Western District of Wisconsin, located in Madison, Wisconsin, until her retirement in late 2019.

“The construction of the Navy’s newest Littoral Combat Ship and naming it after the city of Beloit, with its rich and storied history of supporting our nation’s national security, is more than fitting,” said Major General Anderson. “When completed, the USS Beloit’s voyages will be part of the tradition of small cities and towns in America sharing our story around the world.”

Beloit is one of six LCS in various stages of construction and test at the Fincantieri Marinette Marine shipyard.

“We are proud to celebrate the future USS Beloit today,” said Jan Allman, CEO of Fincantieri Marinette Marine. “The Fincantieri Marinette Marine shipyard is honored to build this capable warship, named for another city from the wonderful state of Wisconsin. I think this is a true testament to the hard work and patriotism of Midwesterners, and we look forward to working with the City of Beloit as we continue building LCS 29 for our US Navy partner.”

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USS Tripoli Commissioned

This article appears courtesy of the Department of Defense.

The U.S. Navy commissioned USS Tripoli (LHA 7) on July 15, 2020.

Although the Navy canceled the traditional public commissioning ceremony due to public health and safety restrictions on large public gatherings, the Navy commissioned the USS Tripoli administratively and the ship transitioned to normal operations. Meanwhile, the Navy is looking at a future opportunity to commemorate the special event with the USS Tripoli’s sponsor, crew and commissioning committee.

“USS Tripoli is proof of what the teamwork of all of our people – civilian, contractor and military – can accomplish together,” said Secretary of the Navy Kenneth J. Braithwaite. “This ship will extend the maneuverability and lethality of our fleet to confront the many challenges of a complex world, from maintaining the sea lanes to countering instability to maintaining our edge in this era of renewed great power competition.”

Rear Adm. Philip E. Sobeck, commander, Expeditionary Strike Group THREE, welcomes the Navy’s newest amphibious assault ship, and crew, to the amphibious force.

Tripoli is an example of the continued investment in our Navy, to increase and maintain our edge on the battlefield,” said Sobeck. “Congratulations to Tripoli’s crew for all of your hard work, amidst these challenging times, to reach this milestone. We welcome you to the amphibious force, of combat ready ships and battle-minded crews to go to sea and support sustained combat operations.”

LHA 7 incorporates key components to provide the fleet with a more aviation-centric platform. Tripoli’s design features an enlarged hangar deck, realignment and expansion of the aviation maintenance facilities, a significant increase in available stowage for parts and support equipment, and increased aviation fuel capacity. The ship is the first LHA replacement ship to depart the shipyard ready to integrate the entire future air combat element of the Marine Corps, to include the Joint Strike Fighter.

Along with its pioneering aviation element, LHA 7 incorporates gas turbine propulsion plant, zonal electrical distribution, and fuel-efficient electric auxiliary propulsion systems first installed on USS Makin Island (LHD 8). LHA 7 is 844 feet in length, has a displacement of approximately 44,000 long tons, and will be capable of operating at speeds of over 20 knots.

Tripoli’s commanding officer, Capt. Kevin Myers, highlighted Tripoli’s accomplishments over the past several months getting through initial sea trials. The hard work and dedication of the entire team during the past few years was evident in the successful execution of at-sea testing.

“Being the third ship to bear the Tripoli namesake is a profound honor and this crew stands ready to carry on the legacy of our longstanding Navy and Marine Corps amphibious community,” said Meyers. “These sailors and Marines will pave the way for those still to come. What’s remarkable is seeing the dedication, perseverance and resilience these new plank owners have shown since day one, and more recently, through uncertain times as the Navy and nation work through a pandemic. There is no doubt in my mind that this team is ready to answer the nation’s call at any time or place.”

LHA 7 is the third Navy ship to be named Tripoli. The name honors and commemorates the force of U.S. Marines and approximately 370 soldiers from 11 other nationalities who captured the city of Derna, Libya, during the 1805 Battle of Derna. The battle resulted in a subsequent peace treaty and the successful conclusion of the combined operations of the First Barbary War, and was later memorialized in the Marines’ Hymn with the line, “to the shores of Tripoli.”

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USS Kansas City Commissioned

SAN DIEGO (June 20, 2020) – Cmdr. R.J. Zamberlan, the commanding officer of the Navy’s newest littoral combat ship, USS Kansas City (LCS 22), reads his orders during the ship’s commissioning ceremony. The Navy commissioned LCS 22, the second ship in naval history to be named Kansas City, via naval message due to public health safety and restrictions of large public events related to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Kansas City is homeported at Naval Base San Diego. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Alex Corona)

Original article appears courtesy of the Department of Defense.

The U.S. Navy commissioned Independence-variant littoral combat ship USS Kansas City (LCS 22) today, June 20.

The Navy commissioned Kansas City administratively via naval message due to public health safety and restrictions of large public gatherings related to the coronavirus pandemic and transitioned the ship to normal operations. The Navy is looking at a future opportunity to commemorate the special event with the ship’s sponsor, crew, and commissioning committee.

“This Independence-variant littoral combat ship will continue our proud naval legacy and embody the spirit of the people of Kansas City,” said Secretary of the Navy Kenneth J. Braithwaite. “I am confident the crew of the USS Kansas City will extend the reach and capability of our force and confront the challenges of today’s complex world with our core values of honor, courage and commitment.”

Vice Adm. Richard A. Brown, commander, Naval Surface Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, welcomed the ship that brings capabilities to counter diesel submarine, mines, and fast surface craft threats to the premier surface force in the world.

“Like other littoral combat ships, Kansas City brings speed and agility to the fleet,” said Brown via naval message. “Congratulations to Kansas City’s captain and crew for all of your hard work to reach this milestone. You join a proud Surface Force that controls the seas and provides the nation with combat naval power when and where needed.”

Mrs. Tracy Davidson, the ship’s sponsor, offered congratulations to everyone who played a role in delivering USS Kansas City to service.

“I am so proud of USS Kansas City and her crew, and everyone involved, for all the tremendous work they’ve done to bring this ship to life. Their dedication to our nation and the Navy is very much appreciated,” said Davidson. “I am privileged to be a part of this ship honoring Kansas City and look forward to remaining connected to USS Kansas City as her legacy grows, wherever she may sail.”

Kansas City’s commanding officer, Cmdr. R.J. Zamberlan, reported the ship ready.

“The caliber of crew required to prepare a warship entering the fleet is second to none,” said Zamberlan. “This is even more impressive aboard an LCS, where every member of the minimally manned team is required to fulfill multiple roles and excel at all of them to get the job done. This crew has exceeded expectations in unprecedented times and I could not be prouder to be their captain.”

Kansas City is the 11th of the Independence variant to join the fleet and the second ship to be named for Kansas City. The name Kansas City was assigned to a heavy cruiser during World War II. However, construction was canceled after one month due to the end of the war. The name Kansas City was also assigned to the Wichita-class replenishment oiler AOR-3 in 1967. This ship saw service in the Vietnam War and Operation Desert Storm and was decommissioned in 1994.

The littoral combat ship is a fast, agile and networked surface combatant, and the primary mission for the LCS includes countering diesel submarine threats, littoral mine threats and surface threats to assure maritime access for joint forces. The underlying strength of the LCS lies in its innovative design approach, applying modularity for operational flexibility. Fundamental to this approach is the capability to rapidly install interchangeable mission packages (MPs) onto the seaframe to fulfill a specific mission and then be uninstalled, maintained and upgraded at the Mission Package Support Facility (MPSF) for future use aboard any LCS seaframe.

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USS Vermont Commissioned

The assistant navigator informs the commanding officer, executive officer and chief of the boat that the commissioning pennant has been fully raised aboard USS Vermont (SSN 792), bringing the ship to life during a small commissioning ceremony held by the crew. Vermont is the 19th Virginia-class fast-attack submarine. In photo, from left on the top of the sail to right, Senior Chief Electronics Technician (SS) Shawn Mason, assistant navigator; Electronics Technician Seaman Joshua Ragan; Lt. Austin Thompson, weapons officer; Lt. Cmdr. Martín Roschmann, executive officer; Cmdr. Charles W. Phillips III, commanding officer. (U.S. Navy photo by Mark Jones/Released)

Original article appears courtesy of U.S. Department of Defense

The U.S. Navy commissioned USS Vermont (SSN 792), the 19th Virginia-class attack submarine, today, April 18, 2020. 

Although the traditional public commissioning ceremony was cancelled due to public health safety and restrictions of large public gatherings, the Navy commissioned USS Vermont administratively and transitioned the ship to normal operations. Meanwhile, the Navy is looking at a future opportunity to commemorate the special event with the ship’s sponsor, crew and commissioning committee.

“This Virginia-class fast-attack submarine will continue the proud naval legacy of the state of Vermont and the ships that have borne her name,” said Acting Secretary of the Navy James E. McPherson. “I am confident the crew of this cutting edge platform will carry on this tradition and confront the challenges of today’s complex world with the professionalism and dedication our nation depends on from warriors of the silent service.”

Vice Adm. Daryl Caudle, commander, Submarine Forces, said Vermont’s entry to service marks a new phase of American undersea warfare dominance for a global Submarine Force that is ready to deter, defend and defeat threats to our nation, allies, and rules-based international order.

“This warship carries on a proud Vermont legacy in naval warfare and unyielding determination stretching back to the birth of our nation,” Caudle said. “To her crew, congratulations on completing the arduous readiness training to enter sea trials and prepare this ship for battle. I am proud to serve with each of you! Stand ready to defend our nation wherever we are threatened – honoring your motto – FREEDOM AND UNITY. May God bless our Submarine Force, the people of Vermont, and our families! From the depths, we strike!”

The ship’s sponsor, Ms. Gloria Valdez, former deputy assistant secretary of the Navy (Ships), offered her gratitude to everyone who played a role in delivering USS Vermont to service. She said she is proud to represent the crew and the first Block IV Virginia-class submarine to enter service. 

“I am very proud of the sailors and families of USS Vermont who worked so hard to bring her to life, and also feel extremely grateful to everyone who played a role preparing her to defend our nation for generations to come,” Valdez said. “I look forward to commemorating this special occasion together with the crew in the future.”

Vermont’s commanding officer, Cmdr. Charles W. Phillips III, highlighted Vermont’s accomplishments over the past several weeks getting through initial sea trials. The hard work and dedication of the entire team during the past few years was evident in the successful execution of at-sea testing. He said he is especially thankful to the crew and their families, ship sponsor Ms. Valdez, and the USS Vermont Commissioning Committee, led by Ms. Debra Martin, for all their hard work and support of the crew.

“We recognize just how important the submarine force is during this era of great power competition. As part of the nation’s maritime asymmetric advantage over our competitors, we are ready to perform whatever duty is most needed. The crew is hungry to hone our skills at-sea and become an effective fighting unit, and we will work tirelessly to justify the nation’s confidence in us. Today marks the culmination of six years of dedicated work by the men and women who constructed the nation’s newest and most capable warship. We are all honored to be part of this historic moment,” Phillips said. “We are also grateful for the families who have supported our sailors through the long process of bringing this warship to life and dedicated their time with patriotism and selfless devotion.”

USS Vermont is the third U.S. Navy ship to bear the name of the “Green Mountain State.” The first Vermont was one of nine 74-gun warships authorized by Congress in 1816. The second Vermont, Battleship No. 20, was commissioned in 1907 and first deployed in December of that same year as part of the “Great White Fleet.” She was decommissioned June 30, 1920. 

Vermont is a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the seven core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface warfare; delivery of special operations forces; strike warfare; irregular warfare; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and mine warfare.

The submarine is 377 feet long, has a 34-foot beam, and will be able to dive to depths greater than 800 feet and operate at speeds in excess of 25 knots submerged. The ship’s construction began in May 2014, and it will provide the Navy with the capabilities required to maintain the nation’s undersea superiority well into the 21st century. It is the first the first of 10 Virginia-class Block IV submarines. Block IV submarines incorporate design changes focused on reduced total ownership cost. By making smaller-scale design changes, the Navy will increase the length of time between maintenance stops and increase the number of deployments.

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USS Delaware Commissioned

(The Maritime Executive)

Original article appears courtesy of U.S. Department of Defense

The U.S. Navy commissioned USS Delaware (SSN 791), the 18th Virginia-class attack submarine, today, April 4, 2020.

Although the traditional public commissioning ceremony was cancelled due to public health safety and restrictions of large public gatherings, the Navy commissioned USS Delaware administratively and transitioned the ship to normal operations. Meanwhile, the Navy is looking at a future opportunity to commemorate the special event with the ship’s sponsor, crew and commissioning committee.

“This Virginia-class fast-attack submarine will continue the proud naval legacy of the state of Delaware and the ships that have borne her name,” said Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas B. Modly. “I am confident that the crew of this cutting edge platform will carry on this tradition, confronting the many challenges of today’s complex world with the professionalism and agility the American people depend on from the warriors of the silent service.”

Vice Adm. Daryl Caudle, commander, Submarine Forces, said he is pleased to welcome the ship to the U.S. submarine fleet and contribute to its unmatched undersea warfighting superiority.

“The U.S. Navy values the support of all those who contributed to today’s momentous milestone and will look for a future opportunity to commemorate this special event,” Caudle said. “The sailors of USS Delaware hail from every corner of the nation and from every walk of life. This crew, and the crews who follow, will rise to every challenge with unmatched bravery and perseverance to ensure the U.S. Submarine Force remains the best in the world.”

The ship’s sponsor, Dr. Jill Biden, offered congratulations to everyone who played a role in delivering USS Delaware to service.

“I know this submarine and her crew of courageous sailors will carry the steadfast strength of my home state wherever they go,” she said. “The sailors who fill this ship are the very best of the Navy, and as you embark on your many journeys, please know that you and those whom you love are in my thoughts.”

Delaware’s commanding officer, Cmdr. Matthew Horton, said today marks the culmination of six years of hard work by the men and women who constructed the submarine and are preparing her to become a warship. He said he is especially thankful to the crew and their families, Dr. Biden, the USS Delaware Commissioning Committee and the Navy League of Hampton Roads for all their hard work and support.

“As we do our part to maintain the nation’s undersea supremacy well into the future, today marks a milestone for the sailors who serve aboard USS Delaware. Whether they have been here for her initial manning three years ago, or have just reported, they all are strong, capable submariners ready to sail the nation’s newest warship into harm’s way,” Horton said. “I am equally proud of the families who have stood by through the long hours of shift work, testing, and sea trials and supported our mission with patriotism and devotion.”

This is the first time in nearly 100 years the name “Delaware” has been used for a U.S. Navy vessel. It is the seventh U.S. Navy ship, and first submarine, to bear the name of the state of Delaware.  Delaware is a flexible, multi-mission platform designed to carry out the seven core competencies of the submarine force: anti-submarine warfare; anti-surface warfare; delivery of special operations forces; strike warfare; irregular warfare; intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance; and mine warfare.

The submarine is 377 feet long, has a 34-foot beam, and will be able to dive to depths greater than 800 feet and operate at speeds in excess of 25 knots submerged. It will operate for over 30 years without ever refueling. Delaware’s keel was laid April 30, 2016, and was christened during a ceremony Oct. 20, 2018. It is the final Block III Virginia-class submarine, before the next wave of Block IV deliveries.

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USS Canberra Keel Laying

Marise Payne, minister for foreign affairs in Australia, welds her initials into the keel of the USS Canberra at Austal USA in Mobile, Alabama, Tuesday, March 10, 2020. Austal picture.

Original article appears courtesy of Naval News

The future USS Canberra will be the 30th Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) for the U.S. Navy, and the 15th Independence-class LCS built by Austal USA.

Marise Payne was appointed Australia’s Minister for Foreign Affairs on 28 August 2018. A Senator for NSW since 1997, she has more than two decades’ parliamentary experience including 12 years’ membership of the Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade. The Senator was appointed Minister for Defence in September 2015. She oversaw a major renewal of the Australian Defence Force’s capabilities and led the organisation’s increased international engagement program with allies and partners.

LCS is a fast, agile, focused-mission platform designed for operation in near-shore environments yet capable of open-ocean operation.  It is designed to defeat asymmetric “anti-access” threats such as mines, quiet diesel submarines and fast surface craft.  The Independence-variant LCS integrates new technology and capability to support current and future mission capability from deep water to the littorals. Five Littoral Combat Ships are currently under construction at Austal’s state-of-the-art module manufacturing shipyard in Mobile, Alabama.

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Future USS Mobile (LCS 26) Christened

(Image Courtesy of Times San Diego)

An audience of over a thousand dignitaries, community leaders, and Austal USA employees celebrated the christening of the future USS Mobile (LCS 26) today at Austal’s advanced ship manufacturing facility. This is the third U.S. Navy ship christened here in 2019 and the fifth ship named after Mobile, Alabama.  Mobile is the 13th of 19 small surface combatants Austal USA has under contract with the U.S. Navy.

“It is such an honor for a future Littoral Combat Ship to be named after the City of Mobile,” today’s principal speaker, U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne, (AL-1) said. “Our area takes such pride in building these fine ships, just the latest vessel in Mobile’s long history of shipbuilding. I know the spirit and patriotism of Mobile will be encapsulated in this ship.”

“This is the 20th ship we have christened over the last five years,” said Austal USA President Craig Perciavalle. “We are blessed to have christened so many ships through the years but this one is special. It is a distinct privilege to build a ship named after your namesake city and this has truly been a community effort. The support we have received from Senator Shelby, Senator Jones, Congressman Byrne, the county, and city has been incredible and has played a major role in our success to date.”

“Manufacturing complex small surface combatants efficiently at this pace takes an incredible team, and we have one of the best teams in the business here at Austal USA,” explained Perciavalle. “With Incredible speed, volume, flexibility and firepower, Mobile will be the coolest, most formidable small surface combatant on the planet, one that meets the needs of the Navy of today, while having the adaptability to meet the needs of the Navy of tomorrow, a ship that will represent the best that America has to offer across the globe for decades.”

The ship’s sponsor, Rebecca Byrne, has devoted her career to serving others. She is president and chief executive officer of The Community Foundation of South Alabama and was previously executive director of United Way of Baldwin County.  Byrne has served in leadership roles for numerous civic, cultural and church organizations, including Chair of the Mobile Public Library, Beckwith Camp and Conference Center, and Baldwin County Trailblazers. An Auburn University alum and graduate of Leadership Alabama and Leadership Mobile, she is a member of the Mobile Rotary Club and a Paul Harris Fellow.

“We are honored to host Mrs. Byrne as the ship’s sponsor,” continued Perciavalle. “Her dedication to improving the quality of life for so many deserving members of our community make her a clear choice as the sponsor of the future USS Mobile.”

The Independence-variant littoral combat ship (LCS) is the most recent step in the small surface combatant evolution. A high-speed, agile, shallow draft, focused-mission surface combatant, the LCS is designed to conduct surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare, and mine countermeasures missions in the littoral near-shore region, while also possessing the capability for deep-water operations. With its open-architecture design, the LCS can support modular weapons, sensor systems and a variety of manned and unmanned vehicles to capture and sustain littoral maritime supremacy. 

In addition to being in full-rate production for the LCS program, Austal USA is also the Navy’s prime contractor for the Expeditionary Fast Transport (EPF) program. Austal has delivered 10 EPF, with a total of 14 under contract. Austal USA is also leading the evolution of connector and auxiliary ships as Austal EPF designs for dedicated medical, maintenance, logistics, and command and control ships continue to impress fleet commanders.

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More than 20,000 Attendees Ship’s Sponsor Christens PCU John F. Kennedy

President John F. Kennedy’s daughter, the Honorable Caroline Bouvier Kennedy, former U.S. Ambassador to Japan and the ship’s sponsor, smashes a champagne bottle over the hull of the John F. Kennedy. On Dec. 7, 2019, the John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) was christened at Huntington Ingalls Industries’ Newport News Shipbuilding (HII-NNS) division, in Newport News, Virginia. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Cory J. Daut)

Original article appears courtesy of Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic

With more than 20,000 attendees, President John F. Kennedy’s daughter, the Honorable Caroline Bouvier Kennedy, former U.S. Ambassador to Japan, officially christened Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) John F. Kennedy (CVN 79) during a Huntington-Ingalls Industries’ Newport News Shipbuilding (HII-NNS) division ceremony in Newport News, Dec. 7.

Kennedy thanked the Navy, Newport News Shipbuilding, as well as the leadership and crew of PCU John F. Kennedy for their efforts to build the warship.

“I’m so proud to be the sponsor of this ship and bring her to life,” said Kennedy. “The CVN 79 crew is fortunate to have such distinguished leaders, this is your day, and our chance to say thank you.”

Kennedy reflected on the first ship to bear her father’s name and how the second Ford-class aircraft carrier will continue to represent her father proudly.

“Having a chance to get to know the people who served on the USS John F. Kennedy (CV 67), really gave me insight into who he was, and what kind of leader he was in a way that I wouldn’t have had any other way. And, I know that’s going to be just as true now with a whole new generation,” said Kennedy.

Former NASA Administrator and retired U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Gen. Charles F. Bolden Jr., delivered the keynote address emphasizing the important role of our 35th president to our nation and the continuation of his legacy through the second Ford-class aircraft carrier.

“This vessel is a symbol of our nation’s strength, technical achievement and critical service our men and women provide for this nation and the entire world,” said Bolden. “This carrier is a tangible example of the legacy of the great man who risked his own life during World War II and the wake of Pearl Harbor,” said Bolden, who added that the future USS John F. Kennedy will join an elite group of aircraft carriers unmatched in strength around the world.

“This incredible ship before us today serves as the biggest instrument of deterrence and carries our nation’s pride and hope for a better world,” said Bolden who added that the future USS John F. Kennedy serves as “a hope for a better tomorrow.”

Some of the additional guests who attended the christening included Edwin Arthur Schlossberg, husband of Ambassador Kennedy; Maid of Honor, Rose Schlossberg, Daughter of Ambassador Kennedy; and Matron of Honor, Tatiana Schlossberg, Daughter of Ambassador Kennedy.

Additional attendees included Mike Petters, President of Huntington-Ingalls Industries; retired Adm. Thomas Fargo, Chairman of the Board of Directors, Huntington-Ingalls Industries; John F. Kerry, former Secretary of State; the Honorable James Geurts, Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition; Adm. James Caldwell, Jr., Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program; Adm. Christopher Grady, Commander, U.S. Fleet Forces Command; Vice Adm. Thomas Moore, Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command; Rear Adm. James Downey, Program Executive Officer for Aircraft Carriers; Rear Adm. Roy Kelley, Commander, Naval Air Force Atlantic; the Honorable Elaine Luria, U.S. House of Representatives, 2nd District, Virginia; the Honorable Mark R. Warner, U.S. Senate (D-VA), the Honorable Bobby C. Scott, U.S. House of Representatives (D-VA), 3rd District.

The Honorable Thomas B. Modly, Acting Secretary of the Navy discussed the significance of the day’s event on a truly historical date in our nation’s history.

“Today is the anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, a day that forever changed the lives of brave American warriors like John F. Kennedy and transformed the way we fought as a Navy,” said Acting Secretary of the Navy Thomas B. Modly. “Much has changed over the past 78 years, but our nation, and our world, still needs brave American Sailors like the ones who will operate and serve on this ship. Kennedy knew what it meant to serve, to lead, and to sacrifice and his legacy will continue with you.”

CVN 79 is the second aircraft carrier to honor John F. Kennedy for his service to the nation, both as a naval officer and as the 35th President of the United States.

Capt. Todd Marzano, Commanding Officer of PCU John F. Kennedy emphasized the importance of this moment during the life of the aircraft carrier, which is 67 percent complete.

“CVN 79 has come a long way since I first observed initial construction in the dry dock back in 2015, following the keel laying,” said Marzano. “I’m incredibly honored, humbled, and excited to be given the opportunity to lead such an amazing team of high quality crew members.”

CVN 79 incorporates more than 23 new technologies, comprising dramatic advances in propulsion, power generation, ordnance handling, and aircraft launch systems. These innovations will support a 33 percent higher sortie generation rate at a significant cost savings, when compared to Nimitz-class carriers. The Gerald R. Ford-class also offers a reduction of approximately $4 billion per ship in life-cycle operations and support costs, compared to the earlier Nimitz class.

The new technology and warfighting capabilities that the John F. Kennedy brings to the fleet will transform naval warfare, supporting a more capable and lethal forward-deployed U.S. naval presence. In an era of great power competition, CVN 79 will serve as the most agile and lethal combat platform in the world, with improved systems that enhance interoperability among other platforms in the carrier strike group as well as with the naval forces of regional allies and partners.

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U.S. Navy Christens Expeditionary Fast Transport Newport

Dignitaries, guests, officials and other community members celebrate at the christening ceremony of the USNS Newport (EPF-12) built by Austal USA in Mobile, Alabama, United States of America, Saturday, November 9, 2019. (Photo provided by Austal USA)

The Navy christened its newest expeditionary fast transport, the future USNS Newport (T-EPF 12), during a ceremony, Nov. 9, at the Austal USA shipyard in Mobile, Alabama.

The principal speaker was Rear Adm. Shoshana Chatfield, President of the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. Mrs. Charlotte Marshall, a Newport native, served as the ship’s sponsor. In a time-honored Navy tradition, she christened the ship by breaking a bottle of sparkling wine across the bow.

“This ship honors the city of Newport, Rhode Island, and serves as a reminder of the contributions the community has and continues to make to our Navy,” said Secretary of the Navy Richard V. Spencer. “Newport is a Navy town where many officers begin their careers and then return later for strategic training. It is right that a fourth ship will bear the name Newport to continue our long relationship, and provide our commanders high-speed sealift mobility and agility in the fight to defend our nation.”

The first Newport (Gunboat No. 12) was commissioned Oct. 5, 1897.
During the Spanish-American War, she received credit for assisting in the capture of nine Spanish vessels. The ship was decommissioned in 1898, but recommissioned in 1900 to serve as a training ship at the Naval Academy and at the Naval Training Station at Newport, Rhode Island, until decommissioning in Boston in 1902.

The second Newport (PF-27) was commissioned Sept. 8, 1944, and decommissioned in September 1945 and loaned to the U.S.S.R. under Lend-Lease and returned to United States custody at Yokosuka, Japan, in November 1949. Recommissioned in July 1950, Newport patrolled off Inchon, Korea, screening during the landings. Decommissioned at Yokosuka in April 1952, she was loaned to Japan in 1953, and commissioned as Kaede (PF-13). She was then reclassified PF-293 and transferred to the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force outright in August 1962.

The third Newport (LST-1179) was commissioned on June 7, 1969. Assigned to the Amphibious Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet, Newport alternated amphibious training operations along the east coast of the United States with extended deployments to the Caribbean and Mediterranean. She was decommissioned in October 1992, and transferred to the government of Mexico in 2001.

T-EPF class ships are designed to transport 600 short tons of military cargo 1,200 nautical miles at an average speed of 35 knots. The ship is capable of operating in austere ports and waterways, interfacing with roll-on/roll-off discharge facilities, and on/off-loading a combat-loaded Abrams main battle tank (M1A2).

The T-EPF includes a flight deck for helicopter operations and an off-load ramp that will allow vehicles to quickly drive off the ship. EPF’s shallow draft (less than 15 feet) further enhances littoral operations and port access. This makes the EPF an extremely flexible asset for support of a wide range of operations including maneuver and sustainment, relief operations in small or damaged ports, flexible logistics support, or as the key enabler for rapid transport.

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Huntington Ingalls Industries Authenticates Keel of Guided Missile Destroyer Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125)

Ship’s Sponsors (left to right) Catherine B. Reynolds and Ruby Lucas trace their initials onto a steel plate that will be welded inside the guided missile destroyer Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125). Looking on is Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant, who spoke at the ceremony. Photo by Derek Fountain/HII

Huntington Ingalls Industries’ Ingalls Shipbuilding division authenticated the keel of the Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125) today. Lucas was the youngest Marine and the youngest service member in World War II to receive the Medal of Honor.

“We are honored to have with us today the sponsors of this great ship, including Ruby Lucas, widow of our ship’s namesake. It is Navy tradition to name destroyers after men and women who served their country with distinction and this ship is certainly no exception,” said Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias. “Jack Lucas was born at a unique point in history and destiny had plans for the youngest service member awarded the Medal of Honor in World War II.”  

DDG 125 is co-sponsored by Ruby Lucas, widow of the ship’s namesake and Catherine B. Reynolds, an entrepreneur and philanthropist who has enabled millions of Americans to attend the college of their choice through her foundation work.

“One of the best days of my life was the day I met Jack. I didn’t know a thing about him, but that day changed my life forever,” said Lucas. “God has always looked out for me and he has always looked after Jack. It has always been my wish that Jack would be remembered for all time. His personal history is without comparison. Now my wish for this ship is that Jack himself would move over it. May God bless this ship named Jack H. Lucas and may God bless America”

This is the first ship named to honor Jack H. Lucas, who, at the age of 14, forged his mother’s signature to join the U.S. Marine Corps during World War II. Lucas, then a private first class in the Marines, turned 17 just five days before the U.S. invasion of Iwo Jima and stowed away on USS Deuel (APA 160) to fight in the campaign. During a close firefight with Japanese forces, Lucas saved the lives of three fellow Marines when, after two enemy hand grenades were thrown into a U.S. trench, he placed himself on one grenade while simultaneously pulling the other under his body. One of the grenades did not explode; the other exploded but only injured Lucas.

DDG 125 is the fifth of five Arleigh Burke-class destroyers HII was awarded in June 2013 and the first Flight III ship. The five-ship contract, part of a multi-year procurement in the DDG 51 program, allows Ingalls to build ships more efficiently by buying bulk material and moving the skilled workforce from ship to ship.

“What makes this place what it is are the men and women you see with these hardhats on,” Mississippi Governor Phil Byant said as he addressed the crowd at today’s ceremony. “Brian I can tell you this, I say it all over the world, ‘We’ve got the best damn shipbuilders in the world.’ A ship like the Jack H. Lucas will keep this world of ours safe. Jack will be back where his spirit has always been, fighting for America.”

James Ellis, a structural welder at Ingalls, welded the two sponsors’ initials onto a steel plate, signifying the keel of DDG 125 as being “truly and fairly laid.” The plate will remain affixed to the ship throughout its lifetime.

Ingalls has delivered 31 Arleigh Burke-class destroyers to the Navy. The shipyard currently has four DDGs under construction, including Lenah H. Sutcliffe Higbee (DDG 123), which is set to be christened in early 2020.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers are capable, multi-mission ships and can conduct a variety of operations, from peacetime presence and crisis management to sea control and power projection, all in support of the United States’ military strategy. The guided missile destroyers are capable of simultaneously fighting air, surface and subsurface battles. The ship contains myriad offensive and defensive weapons designed to support maritime defense needs well into the 21st century.

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